« Rally in NYC Calls on Uzbek President's Daughter to Stop Forced Child Labor in Cotton | Main | Mars Inc. Joins the Fairtrade Movement »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bf90b53ef015435b6011d970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Developmental Effects of Child Labor:

Comments

I was very interested in your article. I was involved in our family business in South America since I was 4 years old. I am currently 30 years old and have constantly felt tired and "fed up" with College and with work since my early 20's. I feel like I've literally worked for the last 26 years. All I want to do is stay at home with my kids. I bitterly resent that I've spent most of my life waking up early in the mornings, going to school and working in the afternoons most days and on holidays. I am completely drained and I believe being worked as a child and teenager are to blame. I also experienced severe math difficulties steming from having to work a calculator, or worse, have to add and subtract on paper under preassure to get it done fast. I only conquered math recently, about 2 years ago thanks to my job and personal finances requiring basic math skills. I had difficulty learning the days of the week, months of the year, reading and telling time during first grade. I didn't know the alphabet by heart until I was in college working as a work study filing papers and I struggled with alcohol abuse during college. I am still very slow to read the time on a clock and have to say the months of the year out loud and count them on my fingers to set dates and such. I think you are onto something in regards to child labor. I am almost certain it had an adverse impact on me. Keep up the good work with your research!

The comments to this entry are closed.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Add
to netvibes

Blog powered by Typepad